Amshay.com
 

FREE Sponsorship theories and advice.

 

 

Thomas Amshay is an auto racing sponsorship and event marketing specialist.  He is the author of a dozen books and nearly one hundred published articles.  He writes from the perspective of having actually done the things he talks about, and he believes no sports marketing project is valid unless it can be tracked for return-on-investment via tangibles such as sales rather than vague concepts such as logo exposure.  His shop, RFTS, is in Cuyahoga Falls, OH since 1985.  He is a former touring racer.

email
 

 


Reference Aisle
 

Mobile Marketing Tours
Another strategy that has mostly crashed and  turned into a money suck.


How to become a motor sports Consultant
 


Sponsors ... buy the team instead
This is an article from  Sports Business Journal that is often requested.  I thought it was pretty innocuous at the time, but it generated a lot of hate mail from teams and some editors stopped talking to me after its publication. 

 

 

 

 

book cover 02.jpg (10267 bytes)
Chapters
1   2   3   4   


The Thing
The New Proposal

Thing Alien.jpg (6077 bytes)

Thing Alien 2.jpg (6089 bytes)


 

Professor 101.jpg (9789 bytes)

101 Ways to Use Racing to Sell Your Products.   This was originally written for auto racing, but by switching a few you could use it for any sport.
 

Coming Soon

The Pay Only For Results Proposal

How to Take advantage of the graying of racing spectators.

Sample Proposal


Kimmie's Sponsorship Intelligence Report
 


  Kimmie

Don't let your babies grow up to be racers.  Well, not the nitwits anyhow.
It can not be said often enough that you never know who someone is and so you should always be on your best behavior.

Thomas was at a truck stop in S. Carolina not long ago (too long a story to explain why he was there buying fuel) and he pulled in beside a rig belonging to the reigning world champion in one of the sanctioning bodies.

He wound up standing next to them at the fuel desk.

He told me the two guys from the rig were real cavemen.  One was the crew chief, and who knows who the other guy was.  But it was obvious they not only didn't like each other, but they didn't seem to like anyone else especially the young woman behind the desk.

So what? So Thomas said if he ever worked for a company that wanted an opinion about the team he would say he wouldn't trust them to be out in the world representing his company.

Sound extreme?  Get a grip children.  There are way more of you than there are sponsors. 


That screeching sound is the brakes of progress being slammed to the floor by idiot race teams.
 

A couple weeks ago Thomas talked about how RFTS will screen teams for sponsors by checking how good (or bad) the teams are in the customer relations department.  This can be done in a variety of ways -- including visiting an event and just observing how the team interacts with spectators.  But one of the easiest ways is to send the team an email passing yourself off as a spectator / fan, and, my favorite, approaching the team as a job applicant and seeing how they treat you.

Appropriately enough, ten days ago I used the job technique with an sport compact drag team.  If you don't know, we are very much into the potential of sport compact racing, but our allegiance is to the company that hires us for an opinion about a team, and true to form this team lacked the good breeding to reply to my job query.  Ergo, my opinion of being able to trust the team's personnel to interact with a sponsor's customers died right there.

Welcome to the new world of sponsorship where how you perform on the track is only half the equation.  Maybe not even half.


Wanna Bet?
 

Got a hate email saying that Thomas was using me as his mouthpiece because he can't say anything against sanctioning bodies because he knows where his bread is buttered and he works for most of them.

Wanna Bet?  Here's a piece he wrote in Automotive News back in 1998.  Notice that it predates tobacco's exodus from the major sanctioning bodies.  Trust me, he doesn't need anyone to speak for him. Click here.


Good News or Bad News?

A trend is developing among brand names.  There is a move toward more promotion and event marketing.  That doesn't necessarily mean they are cutting advertising or sponsorship budgets, though some probably will shift funds from one to the other.

The move to events and promotions means the brands are interested in being able to reach consumers one-to-one, and more and more they want to be able to validate that what they are doing is working.  So they will pay to be where the consumers are so they can interface with them -- taste tests, product demonstrations, and what have you.

While promotions and events tends to favor venue owners -- such as sanctioning bodies -- it doesn't necessarily mean the big sanctions will get all the bucks.  Most of them aren't smart enough to come up with new, affordable, verifiable ways for the brands to get what they want.

Generally speaking the smaller sanctions and racing groups are more into doing stuff that benefits their members (individual racers) as well as the sponsors. So I'd say smaller sanctions and exhibition racing circuits like NMRO, CIFCA, WOO, autocross and road racing clubs, local bull ring, etc. could be looking at an opportunity. 

One of those smaller groups is import or sport compact drag racing, which has everything demographic-wise that most advertisers say they want.   But the sanctions, in my opinion, don't know what to do with it.  Surely they don't know how to bring in spectators.  I would not be surprised if they may have already killed the goose that could have laid the golden egg.  To their credit, though, NHRA has at least learned to crop their event photos so the empty seats aren't always showing.  Smooooth.


Hell Hath no Fury ...
Okay, here's the deal.  I am taking over the site.   Thomas will contribute some words now and then, and the "coming soon" stuff in the Library section will get online, but for the most part it's all me and the book chapters are on hold at four.

So it's up to me to entertain you.  And ideally give you something you can use.

I'd like to begin by saying what creeps I think most of the racing media and sanctioning bodies are.  If you're a racer and you think these people care about whether you get sponsored, I'd suggest you think again.

During the years I worked for RFTS, I heard many tales of dread about racers that had a sponsor all lined-up, and then their sanctioning body pulled the rug out and took the sponsor for themselves.  I recall in the early 90s when one pro team co-owner was so upset by it being done, she had a heart attack.

Thomas usually kept quiet about how he felt about sanctions and media -- at least he didn't talk about it outside closed doors.  But behind closed doors when working for a sponsor or potential sponsor, he let them know what a snake pit racing was (is), and how the sponsorship sellers cared about one thing -- getting the money.

What I found really telling over the last few months was the many editors who would have glommed onto anything Thomas would write for them during the last 15 years -- so long as they had an exclusive -- but those creeps wouldn't run the news items we gave them so their readers would know about the free information on Sponsorship411.  What disingenuous lowlife. Like I said, if you think they are on your side, think again.

That said, I'll paraphrase something I've heard Thomas say many times over the years.  There are almost no writers or editors in auto racing, or people who write about sponsorship, who are not self-serving, and by contrast who are genuinely interested in seeing racers prosper in the sponsorship arena.  The one individual Thomas respects as a model of how editors ought to behave is Ernie Saxton.   Saxton is a business guy, but he has journalistic credibility in that he doesn't try to keep good sources of sponsorship information away from readers of his Motorsports Sponsorship Marketing News.  He doesn't have the "not invented here" mentality pervasive in the racing media.  Some of the jerk editors ought to take a lesson from him and actually do something for the racers.


Writer's Cramp and Worthless Autographs
Thomas knows somebody that is in the throes of putting together a new pro team, and we were talking about it the other day, which is what prompted me to write this.   Thomas didn't mention it to the guy because his advice was not requested, but this is what he would have said -- though probably a bit more elegantly than I say it.

Up front I have to admit that I've never asked anyone for an autograph.  I think it's a stupid thing to do and really don't get it except maybe if you think you can resell the autograph to someone.  To each their own, I wouldn't do it anyhow.  Even though I guess I could have plenty of autographs if I wanted them since Thomas talks with big shots all the time.

Anyhow, the point I want to make is that a racer's autograph is essentially worthless, mostly because the typical pro racer has signed thousands or maybe hundreds of thousands of autographs.  So how much could one be worth?

If I was putting together a team, one thing I would do differently than every other team on the planet would be that there would be no autographs. None.  Zero.

Whoa, who would say such a thing?  I must be a communist or something.  Well, not really.  There is method to my madness.

For one thing, let me restate my opinion that mass-autograph sessions result in autographs that are essentially worthless.

For another thing, most racers don't enjoy signing them.  If you don't believe it just watch them do it.  Incidentally, ten years ago a famous driver for a famous team owner killed his job and the team's sponsor because one spectator who knew Thomas and Christina complained to them about how the guy didn't even look at him while autographing his event program.  T and C just happened to work for the complained about driver and team's sponsor.  That wasn't the only reason the driver and team got axed, but it was the straw that broke the proverbial camel's back.

Back to what I said about not having my driver do autographs.  This would be especially effective if the driver was new to the pro ranks, but anyone could pull it off if they wanted to.

So how would you deal with the disappointed fans?  Simply explain to them that you want to someday be able to use your autograph to raise money for a charity, and the only way it will be worth anything is if it is rare.   Meanwhile let them know you'll pose for a photo with them, no charge.

By the way, if you want to build a huge database to offer prospective sponsors, you could take photos with a digital camera and email the results to the spectator, or work out the delivery some other way.  This cand be worked out so it won't take a whole bunch of work on your part.

Like most things, the above is much easier to talk about than make happen, but it is doable without a whole bunch of trouble.


Toxic People
Last week I applied something I learned working here over the years.

The kind of work we do around here is very mental and time consuming.  Thomas is semi-nuts about the work we turn out, and his insanity is contagious. Take my word for it, the work is mentally draining, but the product that comes out is exceptional (except maybe for my writing, but this is the only place I get to practice).

When I came to work here I saw that there was a certain weirdness about how they did business.  They said that we are so good at what we do that we were doing a favor for anyone we worked for, and we don't work for anyone we don't like.  The main thing they didn't put up with was people who don't do what they say they're going to do.

If you've read any of his stuff over the years you couldn't miss the times he's said to avoid working for someone who doesn't keep their word early on in the getting to know you process when all parties are always on their best behavior.  Because if they do something undesirable then, they will be absolutely awful as time goes on.

The preceding is what was behind the getting paid in advance policy at RFTS.  Thomas says everybody hates getting jerked around when it comes to money, and when the customer isn't paying on time you start to hate them, which makes you not want to do your best for them, which makes you feel like you're cheating them, which all works to ruin the creative process.  So rather than go through the agony of that, he and Christina made it contractual that they got paid in advance or they wouldn't take the job.

Anyhow this last week there was this guy who was wanting Thomas to do some work for him.  Thomas wasn't here and I was in charge.   So I worked out all the details with the guy, which involved several hours writing back and forth last weekend.  Typical preliminary stuff and a cost of doing business.

Monday the guy said he was going to do something, which he didn't.  Then he disappeared for 30 hours.  He had an excuse when he finally materialized, and I gave him the benefit of the doubt.  I told him I'd wait to hear from him, but only until 3 P.M., at which time I would give the hours to someone else.  When that hour came and went I did exactly as I said.  Three hours late I heard from the guy, and he had another excuse and he'd need to wait until the next day to make a decision.  I told him sorry but the hours were gone. 

If you are good at what you do, and a prospect jerks you around, bury them and move on to someone who won't cause you grief and waste your time.  It's a great, great lesson I learned around here, and I'm telling you, you never regret passing on people like that They are toxic to the creative process -- you can't do good work for people you don't like.


I Think it's very bizarre that the sanctioning bodies don't take better care of their racers.  Why is it that when a racer gets hurt or dies in an accident there has to be a fund set up to pay expenses or take care of the kids?

It's great that the racing fans will pick up the slack for the lack of insurance, but shouldn't the sanctioning bodies be more proactive on behalf of the racers?

I also wonder why a sportsman racer's life is not as valuable as a pro racer's life, and why is a middle of the field driver's life worth less than a champion's life.

If somebody gets hurt at a local bullring weekend race they somehow aren't entitled to the same help as a racer running a national tour.  How does that make sense?

How much can it cost for the sanctioning bodies or pro team groups to negotiate some kind of catastrophe coverage for drivers?  I know that Thomas has been advising sponsors for years on how to add an extra million dollars or so of liability coverage in case their team is involved in some kind incident, and the added expense is dirt cheap compared to what's invested in the sponsorship.

I just think it's a shame that sanctioning bodies don't take better care of the people who keep them in business. You can bet the sanctioning body executive benefit package don't leave the hot shots in the lurch if something happens to them.  And like Thomas always says, here's a clue for you -- not all sanctioning bodies are so stingy.

Real Gone Rig
We went to a technology trade show about a month ago.  Hewlett Packard had a race car-type tractor trailer rig on the convention floor and more show attendees were talking about it than anything else.

Race car rigs attract more attention than the cars when on display.  Makes sense since the rigs almost scream "look at me"  I suppose the only downside is that today there are so many big rigs that you have to do something to make yours stand out.
K.

more Kimmie stuff

 

 

Archives for sponsor-seekers


Below are links to 45 Articles that were part of a syndicated series that ran across the auto racing media from drag racing to Formula One.

Written by Thomas Amshay and Christina Clement, who jointly operated motor sports marketing consultancy RFTS, which, despite working almost 100 percent applying mainstream marketing techniques to auto racing team and event sponsorship marketing, grew from a start-up to a regularly top-ranked agency in the Advertising Age and Business Marketing North American annual surveys.

The syndicated articles were an extension of Thomas and Christina's extremely successful books: Get Ready, Get Set, Get Sponsored;  Turning Horsepower into Marketing Power; and The Marketer's Desk Reference.

Amshay and Clement, according to various sports media:

  • "Arguably among the best read columnists ever."

  • " Raised the level of marketing knowledge for racers"

  • "Set the standard for motorsport marketing thinking."


Below are the articles. They are grouped five to a page except the final group which has 15. Click on the blue hyperlink to see a group.

You can also click the below image and go to the Northern Thunder web which has a slew of sponsorship-related articles including those below, and some really great drag racing information.

Group 1

  •  What should (and shouldn't) be in a proposal
  •  Why agents don't work on commission
  •  Books on sponsorship. How much is a sponsorship worth ?
  •  Direct mail; Sponsorship contracts; Writing letters and proposals
  •  Telemarketing; Return-on-investment; Writing direct mail copy

Group 2

  •  Racing as a business; Getting your foot in the door
  •  Invest in your marketing program; Overcoming selling fears
  •  More tips on direct-mail; Theft of your ideas
  •  Cause-related marketing; Image and appearance; Marketing agents
  •  Giving value for money; Advanced marketing reading

Group 3

  • Premium and incentive marketing explained
  • Help. I need a proposal in a hurry
  • Long-term thinking, unresponsive companies
  • Target group size and proving sponsorship value
  • Selling and marketing defined; Developing contact lists

Group 4

  • Return on investment explained and Letter writing tips
  • Dedicated phone lines; Why agents don't work on commission
  • Reaching the right person with your proposal
  • Free advice request and why sponsorships fail
  • Delivering a successful presentation; Focus on marketing

Group 5

  • Does winning matter? Pricing sponsorships; Marketing videos
  • Foot in the door; Team appearance; Female advantage ?; Trends
  • Author's marketing background; Budget stretching
  • Team personality and culture; Cause-related marketing
  • Promotion; Market share; Product marketing targets
       

Group 6

  • Target lists; Is sponsorship advertising or marketing ?
  • Talking to prospects and Learning how to sell 
  • Positioning your team; Developing a fan base
  • Green marketing; Exposure or advertising ?; Telephone manners
  • Dealing with large companies; Selling; Demographics

Group 7

  • Writing proposals; Reaching prospects; Coupons and samples
  • Sponsorship - a good strategy ? Objectives and tactics
  • Exposure rankings; Exposure strategies; Marketing seminars
  • Developing business skills, leadership and team building
  • Conventional thinking . . . and why it doesn't work anymore
  • More conventional thinking, Leadership and team-building skills
  • More on leadership and team building skills
  • Definition of marketing and brand-name building
  • Questions and answers
  • Different types of sponsorships: Grubstakes and Marketing Projects
  • The typical sponsorship and proposal guidelines
  • Questions and answers; Top Ten List of sponsorship tips
  • Starting a sponsorship campaign; The three basics of direct mail
  • More questions and answers; Two proposal strategies
  • More questions and answers

 


 

Thomas' latest book.

book cover 02.jpg (10267 bytes)
Chapters
1   2   3   4   


The Thing
Beats a Proposal

Thing Alien.jpg (6077 bytes)

Thing Alien 2.jpg (6089 bytes)

Professor 101.jpg (9789 bytes)

101 Ways to Use Racing to Sell Your Products.   This was originally written for auto racing, but by switching a few words you could use it for any sport.
 

Coming Soon

The Pay Only For Results Proposal

How to Take advantage of the graying of racing spectators.

Sample Proposal

Kimmie


   Kimmie

Who is this person?

Customers know that Kimmie and I have worked together for almost 20 years.  She was here almost from the start, and was still in high school back then. Kimmie has never been affected by all the big shots and big deals, and so she is always good for an unbiased opinion, of which she has plenty. Kimmie probably reads more marketing and racing research material than just about anyone.  People sometimes say that I am too blunt, but I think I picked it up from Kimmie

Kimmie now works in the movie and production business, but people like to read her stuff so here it is. Thomas

Don't let your babies grow up to be racers.  Well, not the nitwits anyhow.
It can not be said often enough that you never know who someone is and so you should always be on your best behavior.

Thomas was at a truck stop in S. Carolina not long ago (too long a story to explain why he was there buying fuel) and he pulled in beside a rig belonging to the reigning world champion in one of the sanctioning bodies.

He wound up standing next to them at the fuel desk.

He told me the two guys from the rig were real cavemen.  One was the crew chief, and who knows who the other guy was.  But it was obvious they not only didn't like each other, but they didn't seem to like anyone else especially the young woman behind the desk.

So what? So Thomas said if he ever worked for a company that wanted an opinion about the team he would say he wouldn't trust them to be out in the world representing his company.

Sound extreme?  Get a grip children.  There are way more of you than there are sponsors. 


That screeching sound is the brakes of progress being slammed to the floor by idiot race teams.
A couple weeks ago Thomas talked about how RFTS will screen teams for sponsors by checking how good (or bad) the teams are in the customer relations department.  This can be done in a variety of ways -- including visiting an event and just observing how the team interacts with spectators.  But one of the easiest ways is to send the team an email passing yourself off as a spectator / fan, and, my favorite, approaching the team as a job applicant and seeing how they treat you.

Appropriately enough, ten days ago I used the job technique with an sport compact drag team.  If you don't know, we are very much into the potential of sport compact racing, but our allegiance is to the company that hires us for an opinion about a team, and true to form this team lacked the good breeding to reply to my job query.  Ergo, my opinion of being able to trust the team's personnel to interact with a sponsor's customers died right there.

Welcome to the new world of sponsorship where how you perform on the track is only half the equation.  Maybe not even half.


Wanna Bet?
Got a hate email saying that Thomas was using me as his mouthpiece because he can't say anything against sanctioning bodies because he knows where his bread is buttered and he works for most of them.

Wanna Bet?  Here's a piece he wrote in Automotive News back in 1998.  Notice that it predates tobacco's exodus from the major sanctioning bodies.  Trust me, he doesn't need anyone to speak for him. Click here.


Good News or Bad News?
A trend is developing among brand names.  There is a move toward more promotion and event marketing.  That doesn't necessarily mean they are cutting advertising or sponsorship budgets, though some probably will shift funds from one to the other.

The move to events and promotions means the brands are interested in being able to reach consumers one-to-one, and more and more they want to be able to validate that what they are doing is working.  So they will pay to be where the consumers are so they can interface with them -- taste tests, product demonstrations, and what have you.

While promotions and events tends to favor venue owners -- such as sanctioning bodies -- it doesn't necessarily mean the big sanctions will get all the bucks.  Most of them aren't smart enough to come up with new, affordable, verifiable ways for the brands to get what they want.

Generally speaking the smaller sanctions and racing groups are more into doing stuff that benefits their members (individual racers) as well as the sponsors. So I'd say smaller sanctions and exhibition racing circuits like NMRO, CIFCA, WOO, autocross and road racing clubs, local bull ring, etc. could be looking at an opportunity. 

One of those smaller groups is import or sport compact drag racing, which has everything demographic-wise that most advertisers say they want.   But the sanctions, in my opinion, don't know what to do with it.  Surely they don't know how to bring in spectators.  I would not be surprised if they may have already killed the goose that could have laid the golden egg.  To their credit, though, NHRA has at least learned to crop their event photos so the empty seats aren't always showing.  Smooooth.


Hell Hath no Fury ...
Okay, here's the deal.  I am taking over the site.   Thomas will contribute some words now and then, and the "coming soon" stuff in the Library section will get online, but for the most part it's all me and the book chapters are on hold at four.

So it's up to me to entertain you.  And ideally give you something you can use.

I'd like to begin by saying what creeps I think most of the racing media and sanctioning bodies are.  If you're a racer and you think these people care about whether you get sponsored, I'd suggest you think again.

During the years I worked for RFTS, I heard many tales of dread about racers that had a sponsor all lined-up, and then their sanctioning body pulled the rug out and took the sponsor for themselves.  I recall in the early 90s when one pro team co-owner was so upset by it being done, she had a heart attack.

Thomas usually kept quiet about how he felt about sanctions and media -- at least he didn't talk about it outside closed doors.  But behind closed doors when working for a sponsor or potential sponsor, he let them know what a snake pit racing was (is), and how the sponsorship sellers cared about one thing -- getting the money.

What I found really telling over the last few months was the many editors who would have glommed onto anything Thomas would write for them during the last 15 years -- so long as they had an exclusive -- but those creeps wouldn't run the news items we gave them so their readers would know about the free information on Sponsorship411.  What disingenuous lowlife. Like I said, if you think they are on your side, think again.

That said, I'll paraphrase something I've heard Thomas say many times over the years.  There are almost no writers or editors in auto racing, or people who write about sponsorship, who are not self-serving, and by contrast who are genuinely interested in seeing racers prosper in the sponsorship arena.  The one individual Thomas respects as a model of how editors ought to behave is Ernie Saxton.   Saxton is a business guy, but he has journalistic credibility in that he doesn't try to keep good sources of sponsorship information away from readers of his Motorsports Sponsorship Marketing News.  He doesn't have the "not invented here" mentality pervasive in the racing media.  Some of the jerk editors ought to take a lesson from him and actually do something for the racers.


Writer's Cramp and Worthless Autographs
Thomas knows somebody that is in the throes of putting together a new pro team, and we were talking about it the other day, which is what prompted me to write this.   Thomas didn't mention it to the guy because his advice was not requested, but this is what he would have said -- though probably a bit more elegantly than I say it.

Up front I have to admit that I've never asked anyone for an autograph.  I think it's a stupid thing to do and really don't get it except maybe if you think you can resell the autograph to someone.  To each their own, I wouldn't do it anyhow.  Even though I guess I could have plenty of autographs if I wanted them since Thomas talks with big shots all the time.

Anyhow, the point I want to make is that a racer's autograph is essentially worthless, mostly because the typical pro racer has signed thousands or maybe hundreds of thousands of autographs.  So how much could one be worth?

If I was putting together a team, one thing I would do differently than every other team on the planet would be that there would be no autographs. None.  Zero.

Whoa, who would say such a thing?  I must be a communist or something.  Well, not really.  There is method to my madness.

For one thing, let me restate my opinion that mass-autograph sessions result in autographs that are essentially worthless.

For another thing, most racers don't enjoy signing them.  If you don't believe it just watch them do it.  Incidentally, ten years ago a famous driver for a famous team owner killed his job and the team's sponsor because one spectator who knew Thomas and Christina complained to them about how the guy didn't even look at him while autographing his event program.  T and C just happened to work for the complained about driver and team's sponsor.  That wasn't the only reason the driver and team got axed, but it was the straw that broke the proverbial camel's back.

Back to what I said about not having my driver do autographs.  This would be especially effective if the driver was new to the pro ranks, but anyone could pull it off if they wanted to.

So how would you deal with the disappointed fans?  Simply explain to them that you want to someday be able to use your autograph to raise money for a charity, and the only way it will be worth anything is if it is rare.   Meanwhile let them know you'll pose for a photo with them, no charge.

By the way, if you want to build a huge database to offer prospective sponsors, you could take photos with a digital camera and email the results to the spectator, or work out the delivery some other way.  This cand be worked out so it won't take a whole bunch of work on your part.

Like most things, the above is much easier to talk about than make happen, but it is doable without a whole bunch of trouble.


Toxic People
Last week I applied something I learned working here over the years.

The kind of work we do around here is very mental and time consuming.  Thomas is semi-nuts about the work we turn out, and his insanity is contagious. Take my word for it, the work is mentally draining, but the product that comes out is exceptional (except maybe for my writing, but this is the only place I get to practice).

When I came to work here I saw that there was a certain weirdness about how they did business.  They said that we are so good at what we do that we were doing a favor for anyone we worked for, and we don't work for anyone we don't like.  The main thing they didn't put up with was people who don't do what they say they're going to do.

If you've read any of his stuff over the years you couldn't miss the times he's said to avoid working for someone who doesn't keep their word early on in the getting to know you process when all parties are always on their best behavior.  Because if they do something undesirable then, they will be absolutely awful as time goes on.

The preceding is what was behind the getting paid in advance policy at RFTS.  Thomas says everybody hates getting jerked around when it comes to money, and when the customer isn't paying on time you start to hate them, which makes you not want to do your best for them, which makes you feel like you're cheating them, which all works to ruin the creative process.  So rather than go through the agony of that, he and Christina made it contractual that they got paid in advance or they wouldn't take the job.

Anyhow this last week there was this guy who was wanting Thomas to do some work for him.  Thomas wasn't here and I was in charge.   So I worked out all the details with the guy, which involved several hours writing back and forth last weekend.  Typical preliminary stuff and a cost of doing business.

Monday the guy said he was going to do something, which he didn't.  Then he disappeared for 30 hours.  He had an excuse when he finally materialized, and I gave him the benefit of the doubt.  I told him I'd wait to hear from him, but only until 3 P.M., at which time I would give the hours to someone else.  When that hour came and went I did exactly as I said.  Three hours late I heard from the guy, and he had another excuse and he'd need to wait until the next day to make a decision.  I told him sorry but the hours were gone. 

If you are good at what you do, and a prospect jerks you around, bury them and move on to someone who won't cause you grief and waste your time.  It's a great, great lesson I learned around here, and I'm telling you, you never regret passing on people like that They are toxic to the creative process -- you can't do good work for people you don't like.


I Think it's very bizarre that the sanctioning bodies don't take better care of their racers.  Why is it that when a racer gets hurt or dies in an accident there has to be a fund set up to pay expenses or take care of the kids?

It's great that the racing fans will pick up the slack for the lack of insurance, but shouldn't the sanctioning bodies be more proactive on behalf of the racers?

I also wonder why a sportsman racer's life is not as valuable as a pro racer's life, and why is a middle of the field driver's life worth less than a champion's life.

If somebody gets hurt at a local bullring weekend race they somehow aren't entitled to the same help as a racer running a national tour.  How does that make sense?

How much can it cost for the sanctioning bodies or pro team groups to negotiate some kind of catastrophe coverage for drivers?  I know that Thomas has been advising sponsors for years on how to add an extra million dollars or so of liability coverage in case their team is involved in some kind incident, and the added expense is dirt cheap compared to what's invested in the sponsorship.

I just think it's a shame that sanctioning bodies don't take better care of the people who keep them in business. You can bet the sanctioning body executive benefit package don't leave the hot shots in the lurch if something happens to them.  And like Thomas always says, here's a clue for you -- not all sanctioning bodies are so stingy.

Real Gone Rig
We went to a technology trade show about a month ago.  Hewlett Packard had a race car-type tractor trailer rig on the convention floor and more show attendees were talking about it than anything else.

Race car rigs attract more attention than the cars when on display.  Makes sense since the rigs almost scream "look at me"  I suppose the only downside is that today there are so many big rigs that you have to do something to make yours stand out.
K.

more Kimmie stuff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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